Jennifer Pahre

Jennifer Pahre

Illinois Law Professor Jennifer Pahre has taught courses in areas of insurance law, constitutional law, expert witness work, remedies, and evidence. She was awarded her bachelor’s degree from Stanford University with dual majors in international relations and German studies and was inducted into the Pi Sigma Alpha International Relations Honors Society. She earned her JD degree from Loyola Law School of Los Angeles, where she was the chief note and comment editor of the Loyola International and Comparative Law Review.

Professor Pahre served on the Insurance Coverage Litigation Committee of the American Bar Association and has been a presenter at the Committee’s annual meeting. She has been a regular speaker at the Illinois State Bar Association’s continuing legal education seminars, and she has served as the president of the East Central Illinois Women Attorneys Association. Professor Pahre has published a collection of articles on topics ranging from the attorney-client privilege to developments in biotechnology medicine. She has participated in panel discussions and in live broadcasts on public television, and is a regular contributor on public radio.

Columns by Jennifer Pahre

Exploring Cy Pres, Restorative Justice, and Earned Redemption through Fleabag: Part II in a Series

In this second of a series of columns, Illinois law professors Lesley Wexler, Jennifer Robbennolt, and Jennie Pahre continue their discussion of the legal mechanism of cy pres—by which a court decides a remedy based on how closely it serves the intended purpose (originally from the law of trusts). The authors draw upon the plot and characters of the television show Fleabag to illustrate how restorative justice might help re-center the #MeToo debate away from its seemingly sole punitive focus and more towards the twin purposes of victim restoration and deterrence.

Cy Pres and Restorative Justice: Part I in a Series

In this first of a series of columns, Illinois law professors Jennie Pahre, Jennifer Robbennolt, and Lesley Wexler discuss the legal mechanism of cy pres—by which a court decides a remedy based on how closely it serves the intended purpose (originally from the law of trusts)—a mechanism the U.S. Supreme Court has expressed interest in resolving but about which the Court (in a per curiam opinion) described some reservations. The authors offer restorative justice as a way to answer some of those lingering questions about the remedy and to better tie cy pres to its intended purposes.