Neil H. Buchanan
Neil H. Buchanan

Neil H. Buchanan, an economist and legal scholar, holds the James J. Freeland Eminent Scholar Chair in Taxation at the University of Florida's Levin College of Law. His research addresses economic and philosophical aspects of justice between generations, and he is particularly interested in policies that affect budget deficits, the national debt, health care costs, and Social Security.

Columns by Neil H. Buchanan
The Church of the Perpetual Supply-Side Miracle

In anticipation of President Trump and congressional Republicans trying to pass severely regressive tax cuts for the rich, George Washington law professor and economist Neil H. Buchanan preemptively critiques conservatives’ claims that supply-side economics works. Buchanan points out that the great weight of evidence demonstrates that it does not, and only blind belief could lead one to think otherwise.

Sympathy for the Comfortable: The New Conservative Theory of Compassion

George Washington law professor and economist Neil H. Buchanan explains in plain English what Mick Mulvaney meant when he attempted to justify President Trump’s budget proposal that would cut programs that help America’s most vulnerable, such as Meals on Wheels and subsidized school lunches for poor children. As Buchanan explains, Mulvaney’s explanation is based on a false notion that better-off people gain as much utility from each dollar as worse-off people receive from the same amount.

Things Republicans Say They Believe That They Do Not Really Believe

George Washington law professor and economist Neil H. Buchanan discusses recurring instances of dishonesty within America’s political parties, specifically among Republican politicians. Buchanan highlights several examples of Republican dishonesty and hypocrisy, and illustrates how Republicans’ claims are easy to dissect now that they are in control of a large portion of government.

How Will America Resist Trump’s Lust for Absolute Power?

George Washington law professor and economist Neil H. Buchanan considers where resistance may arise during Donald Trump’s presidency. Specifically, Buchanan considers the three branches of government and identifies where in each branch resistance to Trump is strongest, as well as where it needs to be augmented.

Talking Ourselves Out of Doing Anything to Resist Trump

George Washington law professor and economist Neil H. Buchanan discusses how anti-Trump voters should (and should not) talk to those who supported Trump. Buchanan argues that if economic issues are not the primary concern, then anti-Trump voters should focus instead on directly (yet respectfully) discussing social issues and identity politics.

Who Is To Blame? Understanding Trump’s Rise In Order to Guarantee His Fall

George Washington law professor and economist Neil H. Buchanan argues that two groups are primarily responsible for electing Donald Trump: Republican officeholders who knew better and non-voters (especially younger voters) who ignored their responsibility to the future. Buchanan calls upon all voters to fight now harder than ever to restore and protect our constitutional democracy.

Another Excuse for Possible Constitutional Overreach by Trump

George Washington law professor and economist Neil H. Buchanan explores how President-elect Donald Trump could seize upon, or even create, a debt ceiling crisis as a way to enhance his executive powers. Buchanan explains that Trump could put himself into a “trilemma” on purpose, giving himself no choice but to pick and choose which of the government’s debts he would pay and which he would not.

I Might Actually Agree With Trump About Something, Someday, Maybe

George Washington law professor and economist Neil H. Buchanan explains how and why House Republicans might put President-elect Donald Trump in a debt ceiling crisis, just as they did to President Obama. Buchanan points out that Trump might rightfully choose to ignore the debt ceiling law, which Buchanan argues is unconstitutional anyway.

Trump Should Work With Democrats on an Infrastructure Plan

George Washington law professor and economist Neil H. Buchanan explains why President-elect Donald Trump should work with Democrats to achieve the infrastructure plan he described during his campaign. As Buchanan argues, Trump can benefit politically from an infrastructure spending bill in ways that he would not if he were to focus instead on regressive tax cuts or changing international trade policy.

The Infrastructure-for-Voting-Rights Quid Pro Quo

George Washington law professor and economist Neil H. Buchanan explains why congressional Democrats should not support President-elect Trump’s proposal of a large public infrastructure rebuilding program. Buchanan argues that instead, Democrats should demand support for voting rights in exchange for their support for his infrastructure spending.

The End of Genuine Law and Order in the United States?

In the aftermath of the presidential election, George Washington law professor and economist Neil H. Buchanan considers what it would mean on the ground for the rule of law to be eroded to the point of obliteration. Buchanan describes how Trump and Republican might play constitutional hardball in a manner that spells the end of the rule of law.

Young Voters, This Is Your Chance to Make History. Enjoy It!

George Washington law professor and economist Neil H. Buchanan explains why the 2016 election is an opportunity for young voters to have the unusual opportunity to make a difference in their future. Buchanan argues that voting for Hillary Clinton is the only way to exercise that power in a way that gives young people hope for a positive future.

The WikiLeaks Nothingburger

George Washington law professor and economist Neil H. Buchanan describes how news outlets are stretching to try to make news out of the contents of the Clinton campaign emails released by WikiLeaks. Buchanan argues that the emails reveal nothing remarkable or problematic about the Clinton campaign’s inner workings and in fact support her claim of fitness for presidency.

Republicans Always Lose the Tax Fairness Debate, and Trump Turns It Into a Rout

George Washington law professor and economist Neil H. Buchanan explains why, with the information that we currently have, there is no way to determine whether Donald Trump’s tax strategies were legal or illegal. Buchanan argues that regardless of the answer to that question, there are still too many special provisions for people like Trump—particularly with respect to the real estate sector.

Good Economic News Is Good for Clinton and Bad for Trump

George Washington law professor and economist Neil H. Buchanan revisits Donald Trump’s proposed economic policies in his latest column. Buchanan summarizes these policies and explains why they are counterintuitive to the reality of today’s improving U.S. economy. Trump merely repeats the same talking points and claims the economy will continue to falter without the benefit of his leadership, despite all evidence to the contrary. This, Buchanan notes, offers Hillary Clinton the opportunity to present a positive counter-view and gain much-needed momentum leading up to the election.

Trump’s Economic Policy Announcements Keep Changing, But They Never Get Better

George Washington law professor and economist Neil H. Buchanan explores US presidential candidate Donald Trump’s frequently changing economic policy announcements. Buchanan highlights why Trump’s proposed policies are difficult to assess by noting that most lack sufficient detail to predict how they might work in practice. Buchanan also evaluates Trump’s statements, to the extent possible, compares them to Hillary Clinton’s positions on the same issues, and explains where Trump’s would ultimately fall short, should he win this November.

Social Security’s Political Future in a Clinton Administration

George Washington law professor and economist Neil H. Buchanan explains why young Americans and black Americans should not believe Trump’s (and Republicans’) claims that they have nothing to lose by dismantling Social Security and Medicare. Buchanan describes the so-called reduced benefits scenario that could happen in the unlikely event that the trust balance reaches zero and contrasts that with the enhanced benefits that could result from a Clinton presidency.

Trump Throws Off the Last Pretense That His Campaign Is Not About Bigotry

George Washington law professor and economist Neil H. Buchanan comments on Donald Trump’s inclusion of Brexit provocateur Nigel Farage as a speaker at a rally in Mississippi. Buchanan argues that the presence of such an openly anti-immigrant, whites-first agitator alongside Trump can mean only one thing about Trump’s own campaign for president.